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Posts Tagged ‘Business Sustainability’

For centuries, humanity has focused on what Paul Hawken called the Take-Make-Waste model. Take what Nature has created in our Biosphere. Make what you want without regard to being a good Steward and replant to grow future resources. And last, but worst, create Waste that is not recycled nor repurposed.

This practice has last for millennia. It has crossed almost all cultures. It has been practiced in agrarian, as well as, industrial societies.  It has occurred in Communist countries with little or no environmental regulations, to Capitalistic societies who often push back on environmental regulations.

But what has the been the cost? That varies from region to region. The sort answer is the loss of the Biosphere that may not be replicated or recovered from poor practices. In a changing world economy, all resources are precious. Can we still embrace the Take-Make-Waste model? Read what is an example in China: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/12/141218081008.htm

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“Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters.”  ~ Albert Einstein
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Decisions from executives often set the stage for “next steps” for competitors and advisories from other external sources (i.e. NGOs, The Media, etc.). Actions can be direct and confrontational, they can be provide a collaborative approach to bring parties into discussions, or they can be cleverly diffused by pointing out inaccuracy in an opponent’s bias and misinformation.

In this case, the New York Times (NYT) demonstrates its agenda and continued its campaign against “big business” and in particular, Walmart. Often recognized as an extreme left leaning viewpoint (I have heard people refer to it as the “Daily Worker” or worse). The NYT seldom apologizes for its opinions that are often injected into their daily articles. Only a few decades ago, fact finding and verification used to be instilled in every newspaper as a standard operating procedure. However, today there seems to be a broader latitude for the writer in a recent article criticizing Walmart.

In terms of transparency, the NYT will not be accused of being “fair’ nor “balanced” in their opinions or reporting. For the public at large, I suggest they would consider their writings are often dubious and out of touch with the real world, especially with the public comments shown both on the Walmart blog and LinkedIn.

But what is even more peculiar is that NYT seldom writes about Corporate Social Responsibility, let alone Sustainability. Matt Polsky, senior fellow for sustainability innovation and multidisciplinary thought at Fairleigh Dickinson University’s Institute for Sustainable Enterprise, has written several times in GreenBiz and posed a key question: “Where is sustainability in The New York Times?”. For a good read, please follow this link to his article: http://www.greenbiz.com/blog/2012/09/20/where-sustainability-new-york-times

Obviously, what is printed in the paper is the reflection of the mind set of the values of the enterprise, for they are a business, based on sensationalization, to increase their revenue, not for “truth or a cause”.

David Tovar, Vice President, Walmart Corporate Communications, used the third option to cleverly and clearly point out the inaccuracies of NYT article, “The Corporate Daddy”, and simultaneously protected Walmart’s brand image. His preamble provided the framework. By classifying the article as the “first draft”, Tovar took the high road as the mentor, not a critic. This was a “lesson” for writer and included the bold red letting.

Whether the writer was unaware of Walmart’s commitment to Sustainability, which includes its internal stakeholders, is not obvious. However, Walmart has demonstrated that revenues can increase, costs can decrease, social issues address and environmental issues reduced. They have impacted multiple industries (i.e. beef, fish, gold, diamonds, etc.). Walmart influenced those entire supply chains and encouraged industry certifications to limit over consumption and promote sustainable practices and resources. Their actions have been documented in multiple studies and white papers as to what a very large multinational corporation can accomplish when refocused and aligned to Sustainability principles.

Please take a few minutes and read what “lessons” Tovar wrote and clarified for the NYT. Many people with common business sense will probably applaud this approach. For it provides flexibility and other strategic choices in confronting bias and unfounded accusations. Clever indeed and an approach to emulate: http://blog.walmart.com/fact-check-the-new-york-times-the-corporate-daddy

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Building a bridge to benefits thumbnail

Owners, Executive and other Leaders are investigating a global world concerned about Sustainability, that type of understanding can be difficult to obtain. In early December 2013, I published my second book entitled “Building a Bridge to Benefits”. If you are interested in reading about the book or want to purchase copies today, here is the link to CreateSpace, an Amazon company, go to: Building a Bridge to Benefits –  Password: book2013  Discount: A37ZVRKK
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Contact information and Services
A Certified Sustainability and Quality consultancy
•    Sustainability and Quality Consulting
•    Sustainability and Quality Workshops
•    Sustainability and Quality Speaking Engagements

Jarvis Business Solutions, LLC

Toll Free: (888) 743-3128
Email: Ralph.Jarvis@JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Web site: http://www.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com

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“The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”
~ Chinese Proverb
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Decisions to align executive packages to objectives is not a new idea. However, to illustrate how some companies are seriously taking Sustainability, forward-thinking corporations are doing just that. In January 2014, more than 1600 global business leaders attended Davos 2014 World Economic Forum in Switzerland. The hot topic, ‘doing business the right way’.

A kick-off panel introduced a new and radical strategy on executive packages and aligning efforts to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). Panel members included PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi and Pricewaterhouse chairman Dennis Nally, both are considered global leaders in promoting Sustainability.

Today, some 269 company’s in the Standard and Poor’s 500 Index are considering implementing some Sustainability measures relating to environmental and social issues. Two examples are: Intel, computer chip maker maker, and Alcoa one of the largest producer of aluminum.

“For sustainable solutions you have to have a responsible private sector,” says Stephan Tanda, top executive of Royal DSM NV(a Dutch-headquartered life and materials science company). “But it’s also good business. We are not philanthropists. We absolutely believe that Sustainability is good for business, otherwise we wouldn’t have that in there.”

To read more about incentives that affect executive behavior, read how the incentives are taken seriously: http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20140122-the-big-payback

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Building a bridge to benefits thumbnail

Owners, Executive and other Leaders are investigating a global world concerned about Sustainability, that type of understanding can be difficult to obtain. In early December 2013, I published my second book entitled “Building a Bridge to Benefits”. If you are interested in reading about the book or want to purchase copies today, here is the link to CreateSpace, an Amazon company, go to: Building a Bridge to Benefits –  Password: book2013  Discount: A37ZVRKK
______________________________________

Contact information and Services
A Certified Sustainability and Quality consultancy
•    Sustainability and Quality Consulting
•    Sustainability and Quality Workshops
•    Sustainability and Quality Speaking Engagements

Jarvis Business Solutions, LLC

Toll Free: (888) 743-3128
Email: Ralph.Jarvis@JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Web site: http://www.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com

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“I am not a product of my circumstances. I am a product of my decisions.”
~ Stephen Covey
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Decisions, decisions, decisions – and they don’t stop with Sustainability. In fact, they place executives and executive decisions on the carpet each time they make financial corporate decisions. Although the complexity of the enterprise can be simplified, decision-making that considers more than financial consequences can put social and environmental levels in a tug of war – moving away from a financial centric decision to a Sustainability decision that reflects a holistic perspective.

Most of today’s executives were indoctrinated under the economic doctrine of Dr. Milton Friedman. Friedman, who has argued that the primary responsibility of business is to make a profit for its owners, albeit while complying with the law. According to this view, the self-interested actions of millions of participants in free markets will, from a utilitarian perspective, lead to positive outcomes for society. If the operation of the free market cannot solve a social problem, it becomes the responsibility of government, not business, to address the issue.[1]

Friedman also argued against CSR. He believed that management is to make as much money as possible within the limits of the law and ethical customs. He argued that the primary responsibility of business is to make a profit for its owners, albeit while complying with the law. According to Friedman, an agency theory perspective implies that CSR was a misuse of corporate resources that would be better spent on valued-added internal projects or returned to shareholders. It also suggested that CSR was an executive perk, in the sense that managers use CSR to advance their careers or other personal agendas[2]. If the operation of the free market cannot solve a social problem, it becomes the responsibility of government, not business, to address the issue[3].

So why would any executive or owner want to take a journey that could be more complex, filled with harder decisions, juggle the tensions between stakeholders and shareholders and for what? I think Ray Anderson said it best; “And I have not mentioned the value of a tree and removing carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, from the atmosphere, sequestering carbon, and producing oxygen for us to breathe, nor the songs of birds that are heard no more where the forests used to be. Neither have I mentioned the disease spreading insects that now proliferate unchecked because of the birds, their predators are gone, resulting in an increase in encephalitis in the children of the region. So you see, there are serious questions to be raised about the traditional calculation a profit on the sale of timber harvested from clear-cut forest.”[4] So, we are all products of our decisions and Sustainability is a commitment to do the right thing.

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[1] CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY, Reference for Business; Encyclopedia of Small Business; Retieved: 12 Sep 2011
[2] McWilliams, Abagail; Siegel, Donald S. and Wright, Patrick M.; Corporate Social Responsibility: Strategic Implications; Journal of Management Studies 43:1 January 2006
[3] Corporate Social Responsibility, Reference for Business; Encyclopedia of Small Business; Retrieved: 12 Sep 2011
[4] Anderson, Ray C.; Mid-Course Correction, Chelsea Green publishing Company, White River Junction, Vermont, 3rd printing September 2005

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Building a bridge to benefits thumbnail

Owners, Executive and other Leaders are investigating a global world concerned about Sustainability, that type of understanding can be difficult to obtain. In early December 2013, I published my second book entitled “Building a Bridge to Benefits”. If you are interested in reading about the book or want to purchase copies today, here is the link to CreateSpace, an Amazon company, go to: Building a Bridge to Benefits –  Password: book2013  Discount: A37ZVRKK
______________________________________

Contact information and Services
A Certified Sustainability and Quality consultancy
•    Sustainability and Quality Consulting
•    Sustainability and Quality Workshops
•    Sustainability and Quality Speaking Engagements

Jarvis Business Solutions, LLC

Toll Free: (888) 743-3128
Email: Ralph.Jarvis@JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Web site: http://www.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com

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“The art of life is a constant readjustment to our surroundings.”
~Kakuzo Okakaura
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Herb Kelleher is often quoted as saying; “If you don’t change, you die.” When asked by his successor, Gary Kelly, to expand on that notion, he said, “If things change faster outside your company than they change inside your company, then you have something to worry about.”

Change is often called the “business constant”. For change in the marketplace, the government, regulations, Customer needs and wants, various forms of technology, even the issues of land, water and air are variables that influence business and your enterprise. So, I agree whole heartedly with Mr. Kelleher and Mr. Kelly.

The beliefs of Mr. Kelleher and Mr. Kelly are substantiated by McKinsey & Company research. Their experience with scores of major transformation efforts, combined with research they have undertaken over the past decade, suggests that four key functions collectively define a successful role for the CEO in a enterprise transformation:

  1. Making the transformation meaningful. People will go to extraordinary lengths for causes they believe in, and a powerful transformation story will create and reinforce their commitment. The ultimate impact of the story depends on the CEO’s willingness to make the transformation personal, to engage others openly, and to spotlight successes as they emerge.
  2. Role-modeling desired mind-sets and behavior. Successful CEOs typically embark on their own personal transformation journey. Their actions encourage employees to support and practice the new types of behavior.
  3. Building a strong and committed top team. To harness the transformative power of the top team, CEOs must make tough decisions about who has the ability and motivation to make the journey.
  4. Relentlessly pursuing impact. There is no substitute for CEOs rolling up their sleeves and getting personally involved when significant financial and symbolic value is at stake[1].

Change is preparing your organization to lead and be proactive ahead of a change curve. Read this article and understand some of the insights gleaned from Southwest airlines are important. http://tinyurl.com/lxoxyqk

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[1] Aiken, Carolyn B.  and Keller, Scott P.; The CEO’s role in leading transformation; Insights & Publications; February 2007

______________________________________

Building a bridge to benefits thumbnail

Owners, Executive and other Leaders are investigating a global world concerned about Sustainability, that type of understanding can be difficult to obtain. In early December 2013, I published my second book entitled “Building a Bridge to Benefits”. If you are interested in reading about the book or want to purchase copies today, here is the link to CreateSpace, an Amazon company, go to: https://www.createspace.com/4532590
______________________________________

Contact information and Services
A Certified Sustainability and Quality consultancy
•    Sustainability and Quality Consulting
•    Sustainability and Quality Workshops
•    Sustainability and Quality Speaking Engagements

Jarvis Business Solutions, LLC

Toll Free: (888) 743-3128
Email: Ralph.Jarvis@JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Web site: http://www.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com

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Why do we turn to nonprofits, NGOs and governments to solve society’s biggest problems? Michael Porter admits he’s biased, as a business school professor, but he wants you to hear his case for letting business try to solve massive problems like climate change and access to water. Why? Because when business solves a problem, it makes a profit — which lets that solution grow.

Please take about 16 minutes to listen to Dr. Porter and understand why our global  business environment has changed and why business needs to modify it’s models to reflect that change.

Michael E. Porter wrote the books on modern competitive strategy for business. Now he is thinking deeply about the intersection between society and corporate interests. He argues that companies must begin to take the lead in reconceiving the intersection between society and corporate interests — and he suggests a framework, that of “shared value,” which involves creating economic value in a way that also creates value for society.

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“It isn’t just the low-hanging fruit we go after.” ~Ray C. Anderson
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I have read that the Chinese symbol for crisis is union of 2 characters. In Chinese, ”crisis” is an interesting word and is derived from DANGER and OPPORTUNITY.  Whether it is true may be debatable, but in any transformation, executives must be open to new ideas and wisely choose people who will be a catalysts for change. Sustainability is a new mindset.  This new mindset promotes ethics, promotes stewardship recognizing that our planet has limited resources, and ultimately promotes elimination of natural and man-made waste. Therefore, the danger is the reduction or eradication of our biosphere in the next 30 years or the opportunity to preserve our planet for this generations and future generations.

Ray C. Anderson was the CEO and Chairman of the Board of Interface, a global modular carpet company. He was also the first Sustainability pioneer who awakened to the fact that our business paradigms are based on a take-make-waste model. This model, created by Paul Hawkens, demonstrates how most businesses create revenue from poor business practices without considering any environmental impact and exploits society.  It rewards short-term performance without acknowledging long-term consequences.

As a pioneer and visionary, he recognized his short-sightedness and selected a team to help him transform his enterprise.  Anderson searched, not for one expert, but a team of experts to address his corporation’s needs (Dr. Michael Braungart, Bill McDonough, Paul Hawken, L. Hunter Lovins,  Amory Lovins, et al).  Each brought different experiences, different knowledge bases, different mindsets (e.g., architecture, law, environmentalists, chemistry, etc.), but each commonly promoted sustainable development. These team members are still thought as today’s thought leaders for transforming enterprises into new sustainability developed corporations.

In a recent LinkedIn discussion about “circular economy”, I made this comment: “The graphic is crisp, clean and tells an aspirational story, but I would have expected added thought / value from McKinsey. There are many models that have been developed over the last two decades and as you pointed out there are other references to a circular economy.”

The conversation did no reach a conclusion about the diagram, but my obvious problem with the diagram was twofold. First, it did not show how disruptive technology would be integrated tool formulating the solution for a  circular economy. Second, the ultimate goal for Sustainability is the elimination of wastes (e.g., emission: water, air, land). So why would landfills be noted?

McKinsey Global Institute discusses for “trend breakers” from the end of the 20th century to the beginning of the 21st century. In the 20th century, the great moderations (1980-2000) was based on demographics drove economic growth, capital was cheaper, resources were cheaper, government privatized and cut taxes, and each generation was better off than the previous. Trend breakers included: debt crisis, urbanization, aging and disruptive technologies (The term “disruptive technologies” was coined by Harvard professor Clayton M. Christensen as the critical influence to innovation.)

As the Romans said; “Caveat emptor, Latin for ‘Let the buyer beware!’’ Be prepared and objective. Don’t accept web site “solutions” as the ultimate answer for your situation. In most cases, your environment is unique. Understand the basics and integrate your organizations strengths (e.g., commitment, change management, project management, LEED certified architects, IT specialists, etc.) to take advantage of opportunities and avoid the dangers. Be careful and understand what a diagram portrays, for it may not be the “silver bullet” you are looking for.

I would recommend reading Ray C. Anderson’s book, Mid-Course Correction, as I believe it laid out the foundation of Sustainability that is not too different today. When I taught a graduate class in Sustainability. I strongly recommended this reading to my students. Not only does Anderson identify areas of opportunity, but he visually represented an enterprise maturity model that could be overlaid in almost any enterprise. His vision and experience would be of interest to anyone who wants a better understanding of today’s consultants and their differing approaches.

My recommendation is to be educated about what Sustainability is. It is a shared value that considers business, environment and society. It is a long term mindset. It is best implemented by business, as government is often too slow and expensive to implement change. Include your stakeholders, for sharing sustainability objectives with your Customer, Supplier, etc., and it will ensure your corporate direction and provide them transparency as a tool for communication and negotiation.  (This approach was used as a mantra at Interface and leveraged by Walmart in its corporate transformation. All stakeholders need to be aware of the reasons for the transformation, its benefits and commitment by the company’s leadership.)

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Building a bridge to benefits thumbnail

Owners, Executive and other Leaders are investigating a global world concerned about Sustainability, that type of understanding can be difficult to obtain. In early December 2013, I published my second book entitled “Building a Bridge to Benefits”. If you are interested in reading about the book or want to purchase copies today, here is the link to CreateSpace, an Amazon company, go to: https://www.createspace.com/4532590
______________________________________

Contact information and Services
A Certified Sustainability and Quality consultancy
•    Sustainability and Quality Consulting
•    Sustainability and Quality Workshops
•    Sustainability and Quality Speaking Engagements

Jarvis Business Solutions, LLC

Toll Free: (888) 743-3128
Email: Ralph.Jarvis@JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Web site: http://www.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com

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“Always leave enough time in your life to do something that makes you happy, satisfied, even joyous. That has more of an effect on economic well-being than any other single factor.” ~Paul Hawken
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Last week, I posted an article about well-being in context with Sustainability. In contrast, this week we need to discuss the “real world” in an economy that can only be called the Second Great Depression.

Well-being was compared as a recognition of companies and how it could be used to attract new talent, based on desires and needs of new employees, as well as openings in the business. It also shared how employees can be engaged to make business work more effectively and achieve those clear strategies laid out by leadership.

When I worked at EDS, each project had an institutional review, called Lessons Learned. It pointed to our successes, new approaches, failures and how we should avoid them in future projects. It made people accountable. That’s an example of a business approach that improves business practices and refines processes that support those business needs. So, how does that apply to well-being?

Review and refinement is important to ensure the employees understand the values of the corporations. It is also important for leadership to use these reviews as a way of looking at business trends and whether they could impact your organization. Again, how does that apply to well-being?

That brings me to a Gallup report that collect 10 top stories in 2013: http://www.gallup.com/poll/166640/gallup-top-discoveries-2013.aspx

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Building a bridge to benefits thumbnail

Owners, Executive and other Leaders are investigating a global world concerned about Sustainability, that type of understanding can be difficult to obtain. In early December 2013, I published my second book entitled “Building a Bridge to Benefits”. If you are interested in reading about the book or want to purchase copies today, here is the link to CreateSpace, an Amazon company, go to: https://www.createspace.com/4532590
______________________________________

Contact information and Services
A Certified Sustainability and Quality consultancy
•    Sustainability and Quality Consulting
•    Sustainability and Quality Workshops
•    Sustainability and Quality Speaking Engagements

Jarvis Business Solutions, LLC

Toll Free: (888) 743-3128
Email: Ralph.Jarvis@JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Web site: http://www.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com

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“There’s an awful lot of talented people in this country and a lot of them put their own money into trying to break through. But because they haven’t got the knowledge or the business expertise to do it, they fail.” ~Steve Betts
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Originating from NSA and US military needs of analyzing a changing environment in today’s world, VUCA is a methodology that helps assess the environment. It is based on these four phases:

  • Volatility. The nature and dynamics of change, and the nature and speed of change forces and change catalysts.
  • Uncertainty. The lack of predictability, the prospects for surprise, and the sense of awareness and understanding of issues and events.
  • Complexity. The multiplex of forces, the confounding of issues and the chaos and confusion that surround an organization.
  • Ambiguity. The haziness of reality, the potential for misreads, and the mixed meanings of conditions; cause-and-effect confusion.

Understanding the VUCA World
September 16, 2013
Bob Johansen, of the Institute for the Future, with David Small, VP of Global Talent at McDonald’s Corporation, introduce the concept of the VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous) World, and the four strategies to counteract it.

Follow this link: http://www.cvdl.org/blog/understanding-vuca-world/
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Building a bridge to benefits thumbnail

Owners, Executive and other Leaders are investigating a global world concerned about Sustainability, that type of understanding can be difficult to obtain. In early December 2013, I published my second book entitled “Building a Bridge to Benefits”. If you are interested in reading about the book or want to purchase copies today, here is the link to CreateSpace, an Amazon company, go to: https://www.createspace.com/4532590
______________________________________

Contact information and Services
A Certified Sustainability and Quality consultancy
•    Sustainability and Quality Consulting
•    Sustainability and Quality Workshops
•    Sustainability and Quality Speaking Engagements

Jarvis Business Solutions, LLC
Toll Free: (888) 743-3128
Email: Ralph.Jarvis@JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Web site: http://www.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com

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President Abraham Lincoln would have recognized that change is timeless and nestles into each generation. Sustainability is one such form of change. I think Ol Abe would have repeated this quote:

“The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew.”

My newest book, Building a Bridge to Benefits, provides Owners and Executives understanding how and where Sustainability can improve performance and efficiency.

This book provides a step-by-step approach, from Vision to Waste to Tangible Benefits, in molding an organization into a Sustainable Developed enterprise. Building a Bridge to Benefits is a top-down approach to transforming a corporation into a Sustainable Developed enterprise. Environmentalist will say Sustainability is doing more with less. But that does not communicate the real business value to an executive.

I had the good fortune to have the book edited by two key Sustainability experts from the University of North Texas: Dr. Todd Spinks, who is the Director – Office of Sustainability and Mr. Raynard Kearbey – Associate Vice Chancellor for System Facilities. They were helpful in refining the pragmatic Sustainability message I wanted to dispatch to business leadership.

Sustinability is clearly understandable and links to the inter-connectivity to social, economic and environmental domains. Sustainability is an initiative based on methodology, ethics and changing a business mindset. It explains what Corporate Social Responsibility is about and how it could be integrated into your Strategic Planning, not replacing it. It illustrates how a focused effort can leverage Lean Six Sigma as a best-practices, while adopting Ethics and Stewardship principles, implementing transformation and adjusting the enterprise mindset to work within a clearly understood and effective processes.

Sustainability provides awareness of consumption and why creating emissions are problems. It highlights why efficient process are needed and may not be optimized. How it can be used to provide differentiation of their product offerings in the marketplace. Why corporations should weave Sustainability into their overall corporate strategies as opposed to a stand-alone strategy. It answers questions why Sustainability is important to all employees, why link to Lean Six Sigma, why would executives consider making a change to the organization and what are the key wastes that should be eliminated from the enterprise.

As a management consultant, I understand that company Owners and Executives are constantly searching for better ways to do business. Most executives are becoming aware that their competition are benefiting from such a transformation, that government is becoming more invasive and they want to understand where tangible benefits can be gained.

As a senior consultant, I believe Sustainability will be a key centerpiece in every prudent 21st century Business Strategy. While many Owners and Executives are considering Sustainability projects, very few are clear how to effectively implement a Sustainability initiative. Fewer still are not looking to combine Sustainability with Lean and Six Sigma methodologies, but that combination would optimize transformation and instill best practices.

Currently, the book has 12 chapters that approach your Vision to identify and eliminate costly waste:

1. A Vision For Sustainability
2. Executive Commitment And Vision
3. Corporate Social Responsibility
4. Corporate Planning and CSR
5. Sustainability’s Engagement Strategy
6.  All Employees Own The Vision
7. Ethics And Stewardship
8. Good People And New Talent
9. Sustainability and Quality Crossroads
10. Identifying Inefficiencies and Waste
11. Transformation’s Four Phases
12. Realization – Audit and Validation

(Note: The book is now being finalized and any edits may change chapter headings.)

______________________________________

Contact information and Services
A Certified Sustainability and Quality consultancy
•    Sustainability and Quality Consulting
•    Sustainability and Quality Workshops
•    Sustainability and Quality Speaking Engagements

Jarvis Business Solutions, LLC

Toll Free: (888) 743-3128
Email: Ralph.Jarvis@JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Web site: http://www.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com
Blog: Horizons.JarvisBusinessSolutions.com

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